Dallas County COVID Cases Trend Lower, Deaths Remain High

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Dallas COVID Update

751 Additional COVID-19 Cases, 42 New Deaths

DALLAS — As of 12:00 pm March 1, 2021 Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 751 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) in Dallas County, 668 confirmed cases and 83 probable cases.

A total of 2,993 Dallas County residents have lost their lives due to COVID-19 illness. Dallas County has transitioned from Sunday reporting and will now report those case and fatality numbers with the Monday data.

 

Dallas County Health and Human Services is providing initial vaccinations to those most at risk of exposure to COVID-19 and 45,643 first doses of COVID-19 vaccine have been administered at the Fair Park mega-vaccine clinic, which started operations on Monday, January 11. Dallas County is currently administering second doses.

 

The additional deaths being reported today include the following:

  • A woman in her 40’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Irving. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 50’s who was a resident of the City of Glenn Heights. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Cedar Hill. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She expired at home and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Grand Prairie. He expired in hospice and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Carrollton. He expired in an area hospital ED and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Richardson. She expired at home and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Irving. She expired at home and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Desoto. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Grand Prairie. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Wilmer. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She expired in hospice and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Cedar Hill. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of the City of Duncanville. She expired at home and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Rowlett. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. She expired in a facility and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Mesquite. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. He had been hospitalized and did not have underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She expired in an area ED and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 90’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high risk health conditions.

 

COVID-19 Cases In Dallas County Schools

 

During the past 30 days, there were 4,098 COVID-19 cases in school-aged children and staff reported from 650 separate K-12 schools in Dallas County. An additional death of a teacher in a K-12 school from COVID-19 was confirmed today. A total of 466 children in Dallas County under 18 years of age have been hospitalized since the beginning of the pandemic, including 37 patients diagnosed with Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in children (MIS-C). Over 80% of reported MIS-C cases in Dallas have occurred in children who are Hispanic or Latino or Black.

 

“Today we report 751 new cases and 42 additional deaths. While the number of deaths remain high, the number of cases and hospitalizations continue to trend lower. This has led some people to believe that they can relax wearing their masks, maintaining distance, and avoiding crowds. This is a mistake. In order for us to reach herd immunity as quickly as possible and get to the ‘new normal,’ the Parkland Center for Clinical Innovation requires four things to happen.

The first is that we maintain the science and fact-based practices that helped to keep us protected from Covid-19 before the vaccine arrived. This includes masking, social distancing, avoiding crowds, good hygiene, and foregoing get-togethers for the time being.

Second, it requires the vaccine that is currently being diverted away from Dallas County and Tarrant County to be restored. Third, it requires the vaccine the federal government is currently providing to us to continue and for those operations to grow.

Finally, it requires everyone who is eligible for a vaccine to register in as many places as they are willing to drive and to get the vaccine as soon as possible. The best vaccine for you is the vaccine that is first available. They are all highly effective and all have virtually no long-term side effects based on the studies before the FDA approved their use and based on their use in the field.

 

Approximately 13.5 percent of the Dallas County population has had their first shot and seven percent have had their second shot. We must continue vaccinating and not lose our resolve to make those small sacrifices that are necessary to win the fight against Covid-19. We’re all in this together and we will defeat it together,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.

 

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